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17th century Refectory Table

Fine and well patinated three plank top supported by an underframe with moulded detail to the front and side rails with plain rail to the reverse. Stands upon six baluster turned legs that are united by stretchers. To the tops of the legs are moulded brackets. The table is of great character and good colour.
English, circa 1660
Height 30” (76cm) Width 32” (82cm) Length 12’ (366cm)
The height from the floor to the underside of the stretcher is 2 3/4" (7cm); the height of the stretcher is 4.5" (12cm); the height to the table rail (knee height) is 24.5" (61cm)
Stock No. HY100
Offers invited in excess of £30,000

Tables such as this were intended for use on a raised wooden dais in a great hall, standing up off the stone floor. So, unlike some examples, the legs have not suffered from exposure to rising damp and consequently the table is very near its original height, with the stretchers well clear of the floor. High tables of this nature were used for dining by the master and mistress of the house with their guests, the hoi polloi, being seated at trestle tables on the stone floor, below the salt. When not in use the table would be moved back against the wall and used as a serving table.




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Furniture - Dining Furniture

17th century Refectory Table

Fine and well patinated three plank top supported by an underframe with moulded detail to the front and side rails with plain rail to the reverse. Stands upon six baluster turned legs that are united by stretchers. To the tops of the legs are moulded brackets. The table is of great character and good colour.
English, circa 1660
Height 30” (76cm) Width 32” (82cm) Length 12’ (366cm)
The height from the floor to the underside of the stretcher is 2 3/4" (7cm); the height of the stretcher is 4.5" (12cm); the height to the table rail (knee height) is 24.5" (61cm)
Stock No. HY100
Offers invited in excess of £30,000

Tables such as this were intended for use on a raised wooden dais in a great hall, standing up off the stone floor. So, unlike some examples, the legs have not suffered from exposure to rising damp and consequently the table is very near its original height, with the stretchers well clear of the floor. High tables of this nature were used for dining by the master and mistress of the house with their guests, the hoi polloi, being seated at trestle tables on the stone floor, below the salt. When not in use the table would be moved back against the wall and used as a serving table.

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