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Bronze Figure of Terpsichore Greek Goddess of Dance & Chorus

Seated crossed-legged with her head resting upon one hand and a lyre resting in the other, she is wearing the traditional Graeco-Roman laurel wreath on her head and the loose, voluminous chiton robe, edged with the Greek key pattern. She is sitting on a ‘pied de biche’ stool in the style of the ancient Greeks, decorated with scrolls and
anthemion. The whole set on a flat oval plinth. Signed to the lure ‘Habert’ and an impressed AH to the base for the French sculptor, Alfred Louis Habert (1824-1893).
French, circa 1850 - 1880
Height 5.75” (14.5cm) Width 6.25” (16cm) Depth 3” (7.5cm)
Stock No. 1339

Terpsichore was one of Greek Mythology’s nine muses, the goddess of dance and chorus. The name means delight in dancing and she is usually depicted sitting down and holding a lyre, whilst accompanying dancers with her music. Statutes of the nine muses were regularly represented in the villas of wealthy Romans, along with statues of the twelve Ceasars.

Alfred Habert studied sculpture at the School of Fine Arts in Paris where he was a pupil of the renowned Jean-Jacques Pradier and a fellow student of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux. He also studied at L’Ecole Royale et Speciale de Dessin in Paris. In 1861, the quality of his work was acknowledged with a commission to paint the portrait of Emperor Napoleon 111.

Shortly after the acquisition of the Campana collection of jewellery in 1861 by the Louvre Museum, Habert was charged with overseeing the restoration process and, as well as continuing as a master sculptor, worked, from 1864, as a figurative painter for Sevres porcelain.

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Works of Art - Sculptures

Bronze Figure of Terpsichore Greek Goddess of Dance & Chorus

Seated crossed-legged with her head resting upon one hand and a lyre resting in the other, she is wearing the traditional Graeco-Roman laurel wreath on her head and the loose, voluminous chiton robe, edged with the Greek key pattern. She is sitting on a ‘pied de biche’ stool in the style of the ancient Greeks, decorated with scrolls and
anthemion. The whole set on a flat oval plinth. Signed to the lure ‘Habert’ and an impressed AH to the base for the French sculptor, Alfred Louis Habert (1824-1893).
French, circa 1850 - 1880
Height 5.75” (14.5cm) Width 6.25” (16cm) Depth 3” (7.5cm)
Stock No. 1339

Terpsichore was one of Greek Mythology’s nine muses, the goddess of dance and chorus. The name means delight in dancing and she is usually depicted sitting down and holding a lyre, whilst accompanying dancers with her music. Statutes of the nine muses were regularly represented in the villas of wealthy Romans, along with statues of the twelve Ceasars.

Alfred Habert studied sculpture at the School of Fine Arts in Paris where he was a pupil of the renowned Jean-Jacques Pradier and a fellow student of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux. He also studied at L’Ecole Royale et Speciale de Dessin in Paris. In 1861, the quality of his work was acknowledged with a commission to paint the portrait of Emperor Napoleon 111.

Shortly after the acquisition of the Campana collection of jewellery in 1861 by the Louvre Museum, Habert was charged with overseeing the restoration process and, as well as continuing as a master sculptor, worked, from 1864, as a figurative painter for Sevres porcelain.

Sold

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