Current Stock Main Menu

Walnut Solitaire Board

Turned walnut board with moulded edge and three flat bun feet with glass marbles. Marked for play for the game of German Tactics. Nine holes designated with dark green as ‘the fort’ with the remainder of the holes being joined by painted double or single lines.
English, circa 1900 - 1930
Diameter 9.5” (24cm)
Stock No. 1257

This tactical game is played by two players and is a member of the family of games of unequal sides that originates from the Medieval game of Fox and Geese. Printed paper label with rules of play to bottom of board.

A similar board manufactured by John Jaques of London, circa 1920, is displayed in the V&A Museum of Childhood. These boards are also known as General Grant’s boards after they were given to Civil War soldiers as they waited to go into battle. (General Grant 1822-1885, Commanding General American War of Independence (Confederate) 18th US President).

Legend has it that a mathematician by the name of Pelisson in the court of Louis XlV (1638 – 1715) was the inventor of the game of Solitaire. The first evidence of the game is seen in an engraving of the Princess of Soubise, Anne de Rohan-Chabot, made in the year 1697 by Claude Auguste Berey, which depicts the puzzle by her side. Also in that year, the August edition of the French literary magazine ‘Mercure Galant’ contains a description of the board and its rules. This is the first known reference to the game in print. The German mathematician, Leibnitz, also wrote about the game in 1710. Another version of the invention of the game is that a bored, French nobleman, incarcerated in the Bastille, devised the game using an old ‘Fox and Geese’ board, a board widely used for a variety of games from as far back as the time of the Vikings.

Price: £365.00




100%
Games & Sports

Walnut Solitaire Board

Turned walnut board with moulded edge and three flat bun feet with glass marbles. Marked for play for the game of German Tactics. Nine holes designated with dark green as ‘the fort’ with the remainder of the holes being joined by painted double or single lines.
English, circa 1900 - 1930
Diameter 9.5” (24cm)
Stock No. 1257

This tactical game is played by two players and is a member of the family of games of unequal sides that originates from the Medieval game of Fox and Geese. Printed paper label with rules of play to bottom of board.

A similar board manufactured by John Jaques of London, circa 1920, is displayed in the V&A Museum of Childhood. These boards are also known as General Grant’s boards after they were given to Civil War soldiers as they waited to go into battle. (General Grant 1822-1885, Commanding General American War of Independence (Confederate) 18th US President).

Legend has it that a mathematician by the name of Pelisson in the court of Louis XlV (1638 – 1715) was the inventor of the game of Solitaire. The first evidence of the game is seen in an engraving of the Princess of Soubise, Anne de Rohan-Chabot, made in the year 1697 by Claude Auguste Berey, which depicts the puzzle by her side. Also in that year, the August edition of the French literary magazine ‘Mercure Galant’ contains a description of the board and its rules. This is the first known reference to the game in print. The German mathematician, Leibnitz, also wrote about the game in 1710. Another version of the invention of the game is that a bored, French nobleman, incarcerated in the Bastille, devised the game using an old ‘Fox and Geese’ board, a board widely used for a variety of games from as far back as the time of the Vikings.

Price: £365.00

Make An Enquiry Print Page Send To A Friend Terms & Conditions Mailing List

To join our mailing list submit your details below
Your name
Your email