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Rare & antiquarian books: The Church of the Nativity at Bethlehem

Rare & antiquarian books: The Church of the Nativity at Bethlehem

Code: 16049

Dimensions:H: 15" (38.1 cm)W: 11" (27.9 cm)

£345.00

Rare & antiquarian books: The Church of the Nativity at Bethlehem By W. Harvey, W. R. Lethaby, O.M. Dalton, H.A.A. Cruso and A.C. Headlam. Illustrated from drawings and photographs by W. Harvey & others. Edited by R. Weir Schultz, Honorary Secretary of the Byzantine Research Fund. Published on behalf of the fund by B.T.Batsford, 94 High Holborn, London. 1910, for the Byzantine Research Fund in association with the British School at Athens. Bears library bookplate to front paste-down for Robert Weir Schultz, the editor, dated 1899. List of 12 plates and 30 illustrations to the text. Includes plans and elevations of the Church. Blue cloth boards with gilt title to front cover and spine. Boards discoloured to fore edge and minor bruising to corners and spine ends, but book condition v. good, with tight spine and clean, unmarked pages. Some foxing to front free endpaper, but a good, strong copy. The Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem was originally commissioned in AD 327 by Constantine the Great and his mother, Helena, on the site that was traditionally considered to be the birthplace of Jesus. From the collection and library of the renowned Arts & Crafts architect Robert Weir Schultz, who’s home in Hartley Wintney, Hampshire, was one of the country’s first known barn conversions.
England, 1910
Folio

Robert Weir Schultz was a significant architectural influence in the Arts & Crafts Movement, forming a close friendship with both Sidney and Ernest Barnsley as well as the English architect and architectural historian William Lethaby, all of whom playing a significant influential role in the movement. He set up his own practice in London in 1890 and worked on several buildings for the 3rd and 4th Marquises of Bute. He studied Byzantine architecture with Lethaby and Sidney Barnsley and was a leading light in the Byzantine revival.